STATEMENT

Photo by Gu Lang, Miki Wanibuchi, わにぶちみき
Photo by Gu Lang

The boundary line that lies between us is like the skin that tells us we can never be completely identical. I believe it is like the horizon. Even if we thought we reached out and touched it with our hand we could not go the other side of the line. But that’s alright. That’s because knowing should not be such an easy thing.

To find the point of contact between herself and the world (=the other), I walk and show the boundary line, and try to let the viewers feel “in between”. In the far off boundary line shown in white, there is a landscape seen by the artist. You would not truly know the things seen by the artist in the real meaning. However, I want you to try and follow the process of deconstructing each colour of the scenery as if tracing the artist’s thoughts. Hopefully your imagination will work as it tries to understand the true landscape seen by someone other than yourself.

When you notice the boundary line, I want to recall the true beauty of the ability granted to human, this power of imagination. So that people can greet the world and the calm, kind future, which is embraced in whatever form it comes.

09 May 2017 – Miki Wanibuchi


 

A white surface becomes the boundary which separates the viewer from the other side of the painting. In order to pursue where one meets the other – or the world, I have been walking on that boundary and making it my subject matter. Physical input, such as walking around the place where there seems to be a boundary and touching the earth, are important aspects of my artwork. This is because it seems necessary to carefully touch each one by one to actually “know the world”, or perceive the difference between one and the other. In the things produced during this process, I believe there should be real action, traces and tracks of the artist, and this is what I create in my artwork as an artist. Furthermore, my objective is to provide the viewer with a chance to think about knowing others, and perceiving the world.

I think it is not so easy to truly know others, and we need imagination to understand that we are all different. In my recent works, people may feel that they cannot find any detailed explanations in the paintings, mostly covered with white, with the exception of a subtle hint of colour and texture, emerging from underneath or at the edges of the canvas. The white surface represents the abandonment of images and emotions of the artist and my intention is to make the viewer perceive the physical aspects of paint and canvas. The main concept is to allow the viewer to look beyond the white surface, in other words, to look closer at what is in between the canvas as an object and the image an artist would normally paint. I would like the viewer to pay attention to where the artist’s intention and evidence are hidden.

In recent society, our senses seem to have been become dulled; however, I believe that the silence in the pared-down painting leaves the viewer to hone their thinking and imagination in confronting this vagueness. An aesthetic may result from this, leading us to try to know others and the world, and as a result, I feel we will find a power in our pursuit to gently heal the world.

03 March 2015 – Miki Wanibuchi


 

The white surface is supposed to be the boundary which separates the viewer and the other side of the surface plane. It could act like separative surface which distinguishes itself between one and the outside world, the inner and outer side of ourselves. What they would see beyond it should be an accumulation of experiences, common knowledge and understanding, and the imagination acting on it. What the artist actually wants to communicate may not always be conveyed to the viewer. However, my art work allows each viewer to see it differently. Thus we need to understand the differences of people’s individual thoughts.

We cannot help but be aware of individual differences which can act as a barrier when we try to understand others and the world. Because when we meet people and have individual experiences, we all might bring to this encounter our own biases, and one cannot take “common sense” for granted, because this could depend on one’s individual environment and experiences. When we realise this, however, I believe, as a result, it would serve as a trigger to truly know others and the way they perceive things, to understand the world and to lead us know more about ourselves as well. We enjoy enormous amounts of internet information through a touch screen these days. It sometimes makes me feel frightened of the attitude that we easily think as if we know the entire world. People seem to perceive this flood of information, which can be true or false, as a stimulus without thinking, but is it such a really easy thing to “know”?

In my recent works, people may feel that they cannot find any detailed explanations in a painting, mostly covered with white, with the exception of a subtle hint of colour and texture, which emerges from the opening, underneath or edges of the canvas. The white surface represents that images and emotions of the artist are abandoned, because I have an intention to make the viewer perceive the physical aspect of paint and canvas. The subject matter is to allow the viewer to look closer at what’s in between the canvas as an object and the image the artist would like to communicate. Boundaries could exist there, and I would like the viewer to pay attention to it where the artist’s evidence is hidden. And, as a result, I would like the viewer to hone their thinking and imagination confronting this vagueness.

Our senses would have been dulled these days, however, I believe silence in the painting leaves the viewer to pursue the meaning of the painting, their own aesthetic sense, and the world of themselves. And I feel we will find a power to gently heal the world when we pursue it.

25 May 2014 – Miki Wanibuchi


The white surface is supposed to be the boundary which separates the viewer and the other side of the plane. It could be just like a surface of separation which distinguishes between oneself and the outside world. What they would see beyond it could be the cosmos or just layers of paint, and this should be a truth of their own. I think what you see is something constructed by piles of experiences and the imagination acting on it.

We enjoy enormous amounts of internet information through a touch screen these days. It sometimes makes me feel frightened of the attitude that we easily think as if we know the entire world. People seem to perceive this flood of information, which can be true or false, as a stimulus without thinking, but is the world really beyond the screen?

A subtle hint of colour and texture, which emerges from the opening, underneath or edges of the canvas, could make the viewer trace the history of the process of painting. Through this I expect the viewer to select the information from the painting, their own experience or memory, to hone their imagination confronting the vagueness. Our senses would have been dulled, however, I believe silence in the painting leaves the viewer to pursue the meaning of the painting, their own aesthetic sense, and the world of themselves.

The thing you see beyond it should be created by yourselves, so the painting could be only a mirror of yourselves. However, I would like to allow imagination to make people realise others and the world. The boundary line, which seems to lie around there, will never become clear, nevertheless, I believe we will find a power to gently heal the world when we pursue it.

14 January 2014 – Miki Wanibuchi


This white surface is supposed to be the boundary which separates you and the other side of the plane. What you would see beyond it could be the cosmos or just layers of paint, and this should be a truth of your own. I think what you see is something constructed by piles of experiences and the imagination acting on it.

We enjoy enormous amounts of internet information through a touch screen these days. It sometimes makes me feel frightened of the attitude that we easily think as if we know the entire world. Everyone may construct his or her own biased ‘truth’ by accepting this huge amount of information, which can be true or false. It’s true that we have become better at realising what happens in the world, however, is the world really beyond the screen? When we accumulate our experience by walking on our feet, touching with our hands and feeling with our skin, we would be able to answer that question.

For this exhibition, the key to the works is in a single question posed by a little girl at my feet. “What’s the colour of a firefly?” There should not be an exact answer for it, but rather it should be easy to relate for those who have the same experience of “watching fireflies”. I believe that a room for imagination occurs in such a silent pared down painting. I expect my works could have a function to evoke people’s memory. It is not important for you to know what I see, but I wish you could remember your answer within yourself, while confronting the paintings.

White, which covered the plane represents lights which reflect all the colours. If I return everything to you, what comes up, and starts making your new truth? I hope the truth consisted of facts and the imagination could have a power to gently heal the world.

11 September 2013 – Miki Wanibuchi


I am drawn to go to see the horizon, to see myself beyond it dispassionately, listening to the unconsciousness, and make it revealed. As a result, I can make myself aware of who I am and how I exist in this world. The line seems to be the boundary between each of us and the outside world. Both the world and oneself could be defined by capturing the line, nevertheless, it is like the horizon which disappears when we reached it.

My paintings focus on drawing the viewer’s eyes into them through the use of watery or translucent acrylic colour. A subtle hint, which emerges from underneath or edges of the canvas, could make the viewer trace the history of the process of painting. Through this I would expect the viewer to look for their own aesthetics in the imperfection of the paintings, illuminating their imagination. In these days, there is a flood of information and people seem to be able to perceive it as a stimulus without thinking. Our senses would have been dulled, however, I believe my art work could have a function to act on individual aesthetic sense.

We are here living our lives, always estimating the ‘distance’ between ourselves and the world, and there should be an interrelation for better or worse. The boundary line could be liminal, or just like the skin which distinguishes between inside and outside of body. It won’t be able to become clear, but it is obvious that we walk on the line consciously and unconsciously.

14 September 2012 – Miki Wanibuchi


I am drawn to go to see the horizon many times over, and often paint it in my paintings. Waves roar and clouds run fast now and then, however, it becomes silent when each of these comes close to each other. I think I see myself beyond the line dispassionately, listening to the unconsciousness, and make it revealed. As a result, I can make myself aware of who I am and how I exist in this world.

The line seems to be the boundary between each of us and the outside world. Both the world and oneself could be defined by capturing the line, nevertheless, it is like the horizon which disappears when we reached it. Who can perceive the world precisely?

By coming into the small closed space, I would expect the viewer to get involved in the atmosphere and confront himself or herself. The subtle interaction of the bleeding acrylic colours, which can be seen in the painting, represents the passage of time on the surface. To follow it silently, time for the viewer to look at the boundary line would occur. It could help them to look at the personal side to know what is going on around them in their own world.

We are here living our lives, always estimating the ‘distance’ between ourselves and the world, and there should be an interrelation for better or worse. The boundary line could be liminal, or just like the skin which distinguishes between inside and outside of body. It won’t be able to become clear, but it is obvious that we walk on the line consciously and unconsciously.

15 May 2012 – Miki Wanibuch